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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
stay ahead of the growth. instead of trying to catch up and make order out of chaos. >> trucks in india averaged just 21 kilometers per hour. that makes transporting perishable food a big challenge. public transport systems are also out of date. cities like delhi are growing too quickly. >> innovative transportation concepts are required to prevent cities from collapse, but only a few asian cities have already laid ground to cope with future needs. >> one theme at the asia-pacific conference of german business is that the infrastructure of asian cities needs to be completely reexamined. everything from roads to electricity. >> there is not enough capacity for power generation here. that has to be improved, and in the delivery of electricity, there are losses of up to 25% between the power station and the customer. >> german companies hope to play a role in upgrading and expanding the infrastructure. >> still to come, who are the next rulers of china? >> and how a german university is relocating to the red sea. >> we will be back in one minute with more. >> stick around. >> welcome back.
online. today the u.s. economy accounts for 23% of the world's economy and india is 7. in 2030, according to the oecd predictions, china will be 29% of the world economy, the u.s. will be 18 and india will be 11. and those are, i think, really worthwhile numbers to keep in our mind as we talk about u.s. competitiveness in the world economy, because we're entering this entirely new era where the u.s. is going to be a big player in the world economy but no longer the preeminent, the very largest one, and i think that brings real challenges and requires a whole new way of thinking. so my opening remarks, steve was introduced, i think quite rightly, as a guy who i hope is getting cases of champagne and bouquets of flowers from the white house. because on certain readings you could say, you know, he's the guy who got the president reelected. that means, i believe, he has great insight into what obama's second term economic policy will be -- [laughter] and the big question on the agenda which i think certainly already tremendous bearing on u.s., on the u.s. domestic economy and, therefore, u.s.
. it is a different story in china, india, and the middle east were declines will move sharply over the next decade. the international agency -- energy agency believes many will be shipped to asia in the future radically changing the map of global energy flows. >> and no major plunge for the dax today. we on this report from the frankfurt stock exchange on what is moving today. >> to 0.7%, the german stock index, lost in the previous week, so maybe it is already good news that it did not inevitably plunged further on the first trading day of this week. political issues like greece, the fiscal cliff in the united states, keeping investors anxious and earnings season is about to come to an end in germany. so far, very few managed to surprise with their earnings and many doubt whether the outlooks coming in will manage to change the trend. >> let's have a closer look at some of the market numbers. the dax ending just slightly up at 7168. eurostoxx 50 down. the dow jones up a bit to 12.835. the euro is trading at $1.2710. >> we seem to be having some technical difficulties. let's turn to some japanese
, if the governors decide we're going to put all the money into india, it's their decision rather than the part of the more strategic decision-making process. congress would get involved if all the money went to one country. >> do you think? [laughter] >> there's certain country's bbg would like to get rid of that congress wouldn't allow and that sort of thing. but i'm guessing it really needs to be part of really part of the foreign policy apparatus. >> i want to open up to question. we have time for about 20 minutes. please keep them brief so we can get as many as possible. go ahead. >> first time i ever saw -- was 1967 in taipei at usia. it was in chinese. but now i work with two groups. one is dhi esper diplomats which serves the diplomatic community here in washington, and arranges events to show them what goes on you. also people to people international who post the foreign officers at the national defense university. was happen with this is weak, and we take these our homes and arrange events with them, then go back to the home countries and remember us. when diplomats wife went to thail
to russia and they're looking at markets like india. but they've not given up on europe, which will remain its key engine for growth. the european story is more nuanced than the eurozone crisis growth headlines would suggest. in fact, solaris has picked up new business in finland and belgium and will do record sales in spain this year. solaris management considers the company as much european as it is polish and believes the block is strongest staying together. so if the eurozone were a bus, say, none of the passengers should be forced to leave before the ultimate destination is reached. just setting aside for a moment the issue of trade into germany, the polish economy is clipping along at about 2.4% this year. it's expected to slow into next year. so what exactly is the central bank going to do to offset some of that weakness in domestic demand. i'm very pleased to have with me yang, on the committee, and also an academic economist. thank you for joining us. the central bank has been criticized by some for not cutting sooner and more aggressively. and the key policy rate still sits at 4.
company. they are moving it everywhere. india, china, people drinking whisky like mad. >> big deal with india in the past couple of weeks. >> i met with my friend johnny walker black over the weekend. >> how is johnny doing? >> it was at a wedding. he is always there. >> he's a great guy. he should meet by buddy jim beam. >> what's on mad tonight? >> we'll talk about fiscal cliff saying, listen, here's what happens if we solve it. i think this rally today is about solving it. and i'm going to present the world view that is going to be just unbelievable if we get this thing solved which would make a lot of stocks go up dramatically including apple where we would finally get a sense that maybe it's not worth selling because the capital gains tax may not rise that much. >> on friday night intraday was 505. this morning we're creeping up to 548, 550 here. >> i tried to get into the apple store yesterday. apple does have products you want. do they have i-tv? you don't need it because stock is down 20%. i think that apple is a clarity stock. that's the big issue that i'm using for fiscal
. after all it's less expensive to live in india where the stars of the movie end up going. i'm here to talk about an at native to youth nation i can't or out sourcing what soon will be a quarter of the population and to argue that the solution to much that ails us as individuals and as a society lace in rethinking the map of life. a map of life that was in many ways set up for three score and ten for those who seem like longer lives of the past century but is inadequate of five score life spans that more people will be living in the 21st century. half of the kids in the developed rgp world are projected to see their 100th birthday. so we can't just extend this life course that was set up for a very different ark of life to one that is really -- has an extra decimal point and and extra 0 to it. so i think what is happening is today that the nature of life is under every bit as radical a transformation as the numbers are. all those numbers that we're so familiar with. and that the period that's been characterized in these terms is actually an entirely new stage of life. 60 is not the
. the diverse group comes from across the globe colombia, india, nigeria, the philippines and of course, the u.s. there is is sadness we have been talking about over the loss of dallas' star larry hagman. >> j.r. >> wait a minute. >> this is your style j.r. my wife and the man who put cliff barnes in office. >> you have got in plenty of trouble before y'all got married. i don't understand why you think she would change. >> hey, wait a. >> oh, knock it off. >> hagman, of course, best known for his role as the villain j.r. ewing on dallas. he lost his battle with cancer yesterday at a dallas hospital. his co-star on the show linda gray had this to say. larry hagman was my best friend for 35 years. pied piper of life. brought joy to everyone he knew. i will miss him enormously. he was the sob of broadway star mary martin and also known for his role in major tony nelson in "i dream of jean j" he was 81 years old. >> hagman was not just famous here but a legend over in europe when he went to germany he was a rock star, ireland, england, paris. they really loved his character j.r. from dallas. iconi
and germany and india and if we're going to have an american century we cannot come in second place to those countries in technology of the future. and i think that played an important role. there was a sense that the obama vision was one that they thought better suited this moment in our country's history. and there is no question on social issues whether it's women's healthcare or immigration. there was asset of issues that for younger voters was important to think about the kind of country and kind of president they wanted representing them. so on all those questions people wrestled carefully. i think that's why ultimately enough people in enough battleground states chose the president to continue this journey we're on. quickly in terms of demoggrafi. we don't know this for sure but we could be seeing different elections in on years and off years. the election in 2014 is going to be different than presidential lecktorts. and the comments i made were predicated on what we thought would happen in a presidential election. you had latinos turning out. the president won the cuban vote. the fir
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)